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Microbiome Therapeutics Market, 2015 - 2030

Published: Jan 15, 2016
Pages: 218
Product Code: RA10053
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The term “microbiota” refers to specific clusters of commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms that reside in various regions on and within the human body. The human microbiome is involved in various functions that are essential to lead a healthy life. Majority of the microorganisms benefit humans by supplementing them with traits that they would otherwise not possess. These include metabolism of complex carbohydrates, renewal of gut epithelial cells and prevention of growth of pathogens. However, several microorganisms are associated with pathogenic organisms or have the capability of translating into a disease-causing microbe.In fact, an imbalance in the human flora or dysbiosis is also seen to be associated with several long-term diseases. During dysbiosis, it is observed that with the reducing number of beneficial microbes, there is a concurrent increase in the number of harmful microbes. The increase in the number of pathogenic microbes further leads to the development of several harmful diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), cancer, bacterial vaginosis (BV), obesity and chronic fatigue syndrome.

 

In addition to the existing treatment plans for such health conditions, approaches that modify natural formulations by adding or removing individual microbes or entire microbial communities have been shown to have a significant impact on the health of an individual. Usingmicrobiome as a therapy has unique advantages over traditional small molecules or biologics.It can be used to identify individual therapeutic microorganisms and help in designing the therapies customised to the patient’s microbiome. Unlike the adverse effects posed by the prolonged use of drugs such as the antibiotics, microbiome therapeutics have a lower risk of toxicity associated with them. In addition, microbiome based therapies provide a rich source of new biomarkers helping in the classification of the patients into relatively homogeneous subpopulations.

 

Currently, there are many popular probiotics, prebiotics, medical food and supplements commercially available in the market as OTC products. These products are known to prevent a number of diseases by restoring the human microbiome to its natural state. However, these products cannot be used as a replacement for medication or as a treatment for the eradication of the disease. The overall microbiome therapeutics market is still in its infancy with no approved drugs; Faecal microbial transplant (FMT) is the only microbiome related therapy that has entered the market. With several firms and investors displaying a growing interest in this field, the overall market holds a strong potential in the coming years. 

 

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The ‘Microbiome Therapeutics Market, 2015-2030’ report provides a comprehensive study on the current landscape and the future outlook of the evolving pipeline of products in this area. Imbalance in the natural microbiota are a known cause for many chronic diseases such as antibiotic associated diarrhoea (AAD), Clostridium difficileinfections (CDI), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), diabetes, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. While the field has gathered the interest of several companies, there are no approved microbiome drugs available in the market yet; FMT is the only commercially available therapy. The development pipeline of microbiome therapeutics, though, has several promising candidates that are likely to result in commercial success stories in the foreseen future.

 

Among other elements, the report also elaborates on new microbiome based diagnostic solutions being developed and the upcoming opportunities in this market for different stakeholders. As pharmaceutical companies continue to initiate and expand their research programs in this area, one of the key objectives outlined for this report was to understand the future potential of the market. This was done by analysing:

  • The microbiome therapeutic pipeline in terms of phase of development, type of products and indications.
  • The epidemiology, patient population and available treatment plans for the potential therapeutic areas in this field.
  • Partnerships that have taken place in the recent past covering research and development collaborations, product development and commercialisation agreements, license agreements, acquisitions and other relevant agreements.
  • Various investments and grants received by companies focused in this area.
  • The likely adoption of the microbiome therapeutics, the competition posed by the current treatment plans and the expected growth rate over the coming few years.

 

The study provides a detailed market forecast and opportunity analysis for the short-mid term (2015-2022) and long term (2022-2030). The research, analysis and insights presented in this report include potential sales of FMT therapies and drugs in late stages of development. Our opinions and insights, presented in this study, were influenced by several discussions we conducted with experts in this area. These included senior representatives at Assembly Biosciences, Da Volterra, Metabiomics, MicroBiome Therapeutics and Rebiotix. All actual figures have been sourced and analysed from publicly available information forums and primary research discussions. Financial figures mentioned in this report are in USD, unless otherwise specified.

 

 

Example Highlights

  1. Overall, we have identified more than 100 microbiome products, in clinical and preclinical stages,which are being developed as therapeutic interventions for various disease areas. A healthy 27% of the pipeline accounts for molecules in clinical development; of these, majority are in phase II.
  2. In addition, we have captured several start-ups and small-sized firms that have taken initiatives in developing innovative microbiome based therapeutics. Notable examples include (in alphabetical order) AOBiome, Avid Biotics, C3 Jian, Da Volterra, OpenBiome, Procarta Biosystems, Rebiotix, Ritter Pharmaceuticals, Quorum Innovations, Seres Therapeutics, Symbiotic Health, Vedanta Biosciences, Xycrobe Therapeutics.
  3. Several firms are also developing microbiome related diagnostics and companion diagnostics. Examples include (in alphabetical order) Admera Health, Biocartis, Enterome Bioscience, Human Longevity, Metabiomics, Microbiome Diagnostics, Viomer, Whole Biome.
  4. Encouraging clinical results and unexplored opportunities have yielded an intense framework of investment activity with a sizeable number of venture capitalists actively supporting the research. In fact, during 2014 and 2015, there have been investments (equity + debt) of close to USD 0.7 billion.
  5. The microbiome therapeutics market is anticipated to grow aggressively with a healthy annual growth rate of 73% between 2015 and 2030. In the longer term, we expect the market to continue to rise steadily with high adoption rates of existing FMTs and emergence of novel microbiome related products.
  6. Additional analysis suggeststhat metabolic disorders and gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are the key therapeutic areas likely to garner a significant proportion of the overall market.

 

 

Research Methodology

Most of the data presented in this report has been gathered via secondary and primary research. For all our projects, we conduct interviews with experts in the area (academia, industry, medical practice and other associations) to solicit their opinions on emerging trends in the market. This is primarily useful for us to draw out our own opinion on how the market will evolve across different regions and technology segments. Where possible, the available data has been checked for accuracy from multiple sources of information.

 

The secondary sources of information include

  • Annual reports
  • Investor presentations
  • SEC filings
  • Industry databases
  • News releases from company websites
  • Government policy documents
  • Industry analysts’ views

 

While the focus has been on forecasting the market over the coming ten years, the report also provides our independent view on various non-commercial trends emerging in the industry. This opinion is solely based on our knowledge, research and understanding of the relevant market gathered from various secondary and primary sources of information.

 
 
Chapter Outlines
 
Chapter 2 provides an executive summary of the report. It offers a high level view on where the microbiome therapeutics market is headed in the mid to long term.
 
Chapter 3 provides a general introduction to the underlying concepts on the human microbiota. In addition to reviewing the function of microbiota, we have also discussed key aspects of the human microbiome project and the diseases caused by imbalance in the microbiota. Further, we have highlighted the need for microbiome therapeutics along with a brief description of the existing FMT therapies.
 
Chapter 4 includes information on over 100 molecules that are currently in different stages of development (both clinical and preclinical/discovery). In this section, we have presented a detailed analysis of the microbiome therapeutics development pipeline including information on the phase of development, indications and the type of products. In addition, the chapter contains details on different microbiome based diagnostics, medical foods and over-the-counter (OTC) supplements that are approved or under development.
 
Chapter 5 provides information on the various types of probiotic and prebiotic drugs that are being developed as microbiome therapeutics. It features a detailed discussion on their mode of action, range of formulations and the different disease areas likely to benefit from the use of these drugs.
 
Chapter 6 highlights the promising therapeutic areas for microbiome therapeutics. These indications are the prime focus of companies developing microbiome based drugs. The chapter also highlights the epidemiological facts and currently available treatment options for each indication.These therapeutic areas include gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, inflammatory disorders, metabolic disorders and women disorders.
 
Chapter 7 presents details on various investments and grants received by companies focused in the area of microbiome therapeutics. The analysis highlights the growing interest of the VC community and other strategic investors in this market.
 
Chapter 8 features an elaborate discussion on the collaborations and partnerships that have been forged amongst players in this market. We have also discussed the various partnership models in existence and the most common forms of deals/agreements that have evolved over time.
 
Chapter 9 highlights the monetary opportunity presented by these therapies.The analysis highlights the likely evolution of important parameters such as the target patient population and the likely market penetration rates. We have also presented an indicative distribution of the overall market across the well-known therapeutic areas.
 
Chapter 10 provides detailed company and drug profiles of the leading players in the market. Each profile includes information such as the company’s financial performance (wherever available), geographical presence, pipeline of microbiome therapeutics and recent collaborations.
 
Chapter 11 summarises the overall report. In this chapter, we provide a recap of the key takeaways and our independent opinion based on the research and analysis described in previous chapters.
 
Chapter 12 is a collection of interview transcripts of the discussions that were held with key stakeholders in this market. These include JP Benya (Vice President, Business Development of Assembly Biosciences),Pierre-Alain Bandinelli (Chief Business Officer of Da Volterra), Gregory J. Kuehn (Vice President, Business Development and Marketing of Metabiomics), Dr. Mark Heiman (Vice President of Research and Chief Scientific Officer of MicroBiome Therapeutics) and Lee Jones (President and CEO of Rebiotix).
 
Chapter 13 is an appendix, which provides tabulated data and numbers for all the figures provided in the report.
 
Chapter14 is an appendix, which provides the list of companies and organisations mentioned in the report.

 

 
 
1. PREFACE
1.1. Scope of the Report
1.2. Research Methodology
1.3. Chapter Outlines
 
2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
 
3. INTRODUCTION
3.1. Defining Microbiota and Microbiome
3.2. Discovery of the Human Microbiome
3.3. The Human Microbiome Project (HMP)
3.3.1. Project Approach
3.3.2. Project Initiatives
3.3.3. Project Achievements
3.4. Functions of the Human Microbiome
3.5. The Gut Flora
3.5.1. Role of Gut Microbiota
3.5.2. Imbalance in the Gut Flora
3.6. Development of Microbiota in Infants
3.6.1. Mode of Delivery
3.6.2. Type of Feeding
3.6.3. Use of Antibiotics by the Mother
3.7. Relationship between the Human Microbiome and Diseases
3.7.1. Cancer
3.7.2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
3.7.3. Obesity
3.7.4. Type-2 Diabetes
3.8. Need for Microbiome Therapies
3.9. Faecal Bacteriotherapy: A Powerful Tool to Restore Healthy Gut Microflora
3.9.1. FMT and FDA Regulation
 
4. MICROBIOME THERAPEUTICS AND DIAGNOSTICS: MARKET LANDSCAPE
4.1. Chapter Overview
4.1.1. Development Pipeline of Microbiome Therapeutics
4.1.1.1. Distribution by Phase of Development
4.1.1.2. Distribution by Type of Product
4.1.1.3. Distribution by Geography
4.1.1.4. Distribution by Therapeutic Area
4.1.1.5. Active Industry Players
4.1.2. Development Pipeline of Faecal Microbiota Transplant
4.1.3. Development Pipeline of Diagnostic Applications
4.1.4. Development Pipeline of Medical Food, Supplements and Consumer Products
 
5. PROBIOTIC AND PREBIOTIC DRUGS
5.1. Chapter Overview
5.2. Probiotic Drugs
5.2.1. Introduction
5.2.2. Types of Probiotics
5.2.3. Therapeutic Areas Benefiting from Probiotics
5.2.3.1. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhoea (AAD)
5.2.3.2. Infectious Childhood Diarrhoea
5.2.3.3. Cholesterol
5.2.3.4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
5.2.3.5. Blood Pressure
5.2.3.6. Lactose Intolerance
5.2.3.7. Weight Loss
5.2.3.8. Vitamin Production
5.2.3.9. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)
5.2.4. Side Effects of Probiotics
 
5.3. Prebiotic Drugs
5.3.1. Introduction
5.3.2. Source of Prebiotics
5.3.3. Types of Prebiotics
5.3.3.1. Fructo-Oligosaccharides
5.3.3.2. Galacto-Oligosaccharides
5.3.3.3. Inulin
5.3.4. Therapeutic Areas Benefiting from Prebiotics
5.3.4.1. Antibiotic Associated Diarrhoea (AAD)
5.3.4.2. Constipation
5.3.4.3. Gastrointestinal (GI) Disorders
5.3.5. Dysbiosis
 
5.4. Development Pipeline of Probiotic/Prebiotic Drugs
5.4.1. Distribution by Phase of Development
5.4.2. Distribution by Therapeutic Area
5.4.3. Distribution by Geography
5.4.4. Distribution by Company
 
6. KEY THERAPEUTIC AREAS
6.1. Chapter Overview
6.2. Gastrointestinal (GI) Disorders 
6.2.1. Clostridium difficile Infections (CDI)
6.2.1.1. Disease Description
6.2.1.2. Epidemiology
6.2.1.3. Current Treatment Plans
6.2.1.4. Microbiome Therapies for CDIs and Other Hospital Acquired Diseases
6.2.2. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
6.2.2.1. Disease Description
6.2.2.2. Epidemiology
6.2.2.3. Current Treatment Plans
6.2.2.4. Microbiome Therapies for IBS
 
6.3. Inflammatory Disorders
6.3.1. Ulcerative Colitis
6.3.1.1. Disease Description
6.3.1.2. Epidemiology
6.3.1.3. Current Treatment Plans
6.3.1.4. Microbiome Therapies for Ulcerative Colitis
6.3.2. Crohn's Disease
6.3.2.1. Disease Description
6.3.2.2. Epidemiology
6.3.2.3. Current Treatment Plans
6.3.2.4. Microbiome Therapies for Crohn's Disease
 
6.4. Metabolic Disorders
6.4.1. Diabetes
6.4.1.1. Disease Description
6.4.1.2. Epidemiology
6.4.1.3. Current Treatment Plans
6.4.1.4. Microbiome Therapies for Diabetes
6.4.2. Obesity
6.4.2.1. Disease Description
6.4.2.2. Epidemiology
6.4.2.3. Current Treatment Plans
6.4.2.4. Microbiome Therapies for Obesity
 
6.5. Women Disorders
6.5.1. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)
6.5.1.1. Disease Description
6.5.1.2. Epidemiology
6.5.1.3. Current Treatment Plans
6.5.1.4. Microbiome Therapies for BV
 
7. VENTURE CAPITAL INTEREST
7.1. Chapter Overview
7.2. Instances of Funding for Development of Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics
7.3. Rising Venture Capital Interest
7.4. Funding Instances: Distribution by Type of Funding
7.5. Leading Players: Distribution by Number of Funding Instances
7.6. Most Active VC Firms/Institutions
7.7. Most of the Funding is Targeted Towards Therapeutic Applications
 
8. RECENT COLLABORATIONS
8.1. Chapter Overview
8.2. Partnership Models/Agreements
8.3. Microbiome Therapies: Recent Collaborations
8.4. Distribution by Month/Year
8.5. Distribution by Type of Application
8.5.1. Distribution by Type of Therapeutic Product
8.6. Distribution by Type of Partnership
8.7. Most Active Companies with Multiple Collaborations
 
9. MARKET SIZING AND OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS
9.1. Chapter Overview
9.2. Forecast Methodology
9.3. Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Key Assumptions
9.4. Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Opportunity Analysis
9.4.1. Overall Microbiome Therapeutics Market, 2015-2030
9.4.2. Microbiome Therapeutics Market, 2015-2030: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
9.4.3. Microbiome Therapeutics Market, 2015-2030: Distribution by Application
 
10. COMPANY PROFILES
10.1. Chapter Overview
10.2. C3 Jian
10.2.1. Company Overview
10.2.2. Product Portfolio
10.2.2.1. Therapeutics
10.2.2.2. Diagnostics
 
10.3. Enterome Bioscience
10.3.1. Company Overview
10.3.2. Product Portfolio
10.3.2.1. Therapeutics
10.3.2.2. Diagnostics
10.3.3. Collaborations
 
10.4. Immuron
10.4.1. Company Overview
10.4.2. Financial Performance
10.4.3. Product Portfolio
10.4.4. Collaborations
 
10.5. MicroBiome Therapeutics
10.5.1. Company Overview
10.5.2. Product Portfolio
 
10.6. OpenBiome
10.6.1. Company Overview
10.6.2. Financial Performance
10.6.3. Product Portfolio
 
10.7. Osel
10.7.1. Company Overview
10.7.2. Product Portfolio
10.7.3. Collaborations
 
10.8. Rebiotix
10.8.1. Company Overview
10.8.2. Product Portfolio
10.8.3. Collaborations
 
10.9. Ritter Pharmaceuticals
10.9.1. Company Overview
10.9.2. Financial Performance
10.9.3. Product Portfolio
10.9.4. Collaborations
 
10.10. Second Genome
10.10.1. Company Overview
10.10.2. Second Genome Solutions
10.10.3. Product Portfolio
10.10.4. Collaborations
 
10.11. Seres Therapeutics
10.11.1. Company Overview
10.11.2. Financial Performance
10.11.3. Product Portfolio
10.11.4. Collaborations
 
10.12. Synthetic Biologics
10.12.1. Company Overview
10.12.2. Financial Performance
10.12.3. Product Portfolio
10.12.4. Collaborations/Recent Developments
 
11. CONCLUSION
11.1. Imbalance in the Human Microbiota Leading to Rising Chronic Disorders
11.2. Increasing Antibiotic Use is The Primary Cause of Microflora Disturbance
11.3. Microbiome Therapy Offers a Potential Solution to Preserve the Human Microflora
11.4. Several Initiatives are Still in Early Stages of Development
11.5. An Active Support from Regulatory Authorities Likely to Drive High Accessibility
11.6. With a Strong Preclinical Backup, We Expect Steady Growth in the Coming Years 
 
12. INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS
12.1. Chapter Overview
12.2. JP Benya, Vice President, Business Development, Assembly Biosciences
12.3. Pierre-Alain Bandinelli, Chief Business Officer, Da Volterra
12.4. Gregory J. Kuehn, Vice President, Business Development and Marketing, Metabiomics
12.5. Dr. Mark Heiman, Vice President of Research and Chief Scientific Officer, MicroBiome Therapeutics
12.6. Lee Jones, President and CEO, Rebiotix
 
13. APPENDIX 1: TABULATED DATA
 
14. APPENDIX 2: LIST OF COMPANIES AND ORGANISATIONS
 
 
 
Figure 3.1 Achievements of the Human Microbiome Project
 
Figure 3.2 Factors Affecting the Gut Flora
 
Figure 3.3 Factors Affecting the Infant Gut Microbiota
 
Figure 4.1 Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Phase of Development
 
Figure 4.2 Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Type of Product
 
Figure 4.3 Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Geography
 
Figure 4.4 Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
 
Figure 4.5 Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Therapeutic Area and Phase of Development
 
Figure 4.6 Microbiome Therapeutics: Active Industry Players
 
Figure 5.1 Probiotic Drugs: Modes of Action
 
Figure 5.2 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Distribution by Number of Products
 
Figure 5.3 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Distribution by Phase of Development
 
Figure 5.4 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
 
Figure 5.5 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Distribution by Geography
 
Figure 5.6 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Active Industry Players
 
Figure 6.1 Clostridium difficile Infections (CDI): Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
 
Figure 6.2 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
 
Figure 6.3 Diabetes: Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
 
Figure 7.1 Number of Funding Instances by Year, 2005 Onwards
 
Figure 7.2 Amount Invested by Year, 2005 Onwards
 
Figure 7.3 Funding Instances: Distribution by Type, 2005-2015
 
Figure 7.4 Funding Instances: Distribution by Total Amount Invested, 2005-2015 (USD Million)
 
Figure 7.5 Funding Instances: Distribution by Range of Amount Invested by Type of Funding (USD Million)
 
Figure 7.6 Most Active Players: Distribution by Number of Funding Instances, 2005-2015
 
Figure 7.7 Most Active VC Firms/Investors: Distribution by Number of Instances, 2005, 2015
 
Figure 7.8 Funding Instances: Distribution by Type of Application
 
Figure 7.9 Funding Instances: Distribution by Type of Product
 
Figure 8.1 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Year
 
Figure 8.2 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Type of Application
 
Figure 8.3 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Type of Therapeutic Product
 
Figure 8.4 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Type of Model
 
Figure 8.5 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Company
 
Figure 9.1 Microbiome Therapeutics Market Forecast (USD Million), Short Term, Base Case, 2015 - 2022
 
Figure 9.2 Microbiome Therapeutics Market Forecast (USD Million), Mid-Long Term, Base Case, 2022 – 2030
 
Figure 9.3 Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Therapeutic Area, 2025, 2030 
 
Figure 9.4 Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Function, 2030
 
Figure 10.1 Advantages of Different Formulations of C16G2
 
Figure 10.2 OpenBiome: Revenues 2014, Distribution by Different Segments (USD Million)
 
Figure 10.3 Second Genome Solutions Program
 
Figure 11.1 Microbiome Therapeutics Market (USD Million), 2015, 2022, 2030
 
 
Table 3.1 Microbiota in the GI Tract
 
Table 4.1 Microbiome Therapeutics: Development Pipeline
 
Table 4.2 FMT Therapies: Development Pipeline
 
Table 4.3 Microbiome Diagnostics: Development Pipeline
 
Table 4.4 Microbiome Based Medical Food Supplements and Consumer Products for Humans: Development Pipeline
 
Table 5.1 Foods Containing Prebiotics
 
Table 5.2 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Development Pipeline
 
Table 6.1 Clostridium difficile Infections (CDI): Diagnostic Tests
 
Table 6.2 Clostridium difficile Infections (CDI) and Other Hospital Acquired Infections: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
 
Table 6.3 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Current Medication
 
Table 6.4 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
 
Table 6.5 Ulcerative Colitis: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
 
Table 6.6 Crohn’s Disease: Current Medication
 
Table 6.7 Crohn’s Disease: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
 
Table 6.8 Diabetes: Current Medications
 
Table 6.9 Diabetes: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
 
Table 6.10 Obesity: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
 
Table 6.11 Bacterial Vaginosis (BV): Current Medication
 
Table 6.12 Bacterial Vaginosis (BV): Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
 
Table 7.1 List of Funding Instances and Investors, 2005-2015
 
Table 7.2 Types of Funding Instances, 2005- 2015
 
Table 7.3 Amount Invested by Product Type, 2005- 2015 (USD Million)
 
Table 8.1 Microbiome Therapies: Recent Collaborations (2005-2015)
 
Table 9.1 Potential Therapeutic Areas: Estimated Market Growth Rate
 
Table 9.2 Potential Therapeutic Areas: Estimated Penetration (By 2030)
 
Table 10.1 C3 Jian: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.2 Different Formulations of C16G2
 
Table 10.3 C3 Jian: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Diagnostics
 
Table 10.4 Enterome Bioscience: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.5 Enterome Bioscience: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Diagnostics
 
Table 10.6 Immuron: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.7 MicroBiome Therapeutics: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.8 OpenBiome: Product Portfolio, FMT
 
Table 10.9 FMP 30: Specifications
 
Table 10.10 FMP 250: Specifications
 
Table 10.11 Osel: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.12 Rebiotix: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.13 Ritter Pharmaceuticals: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.14 Second Genome: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.15 Seres Therapeutics: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 10.16 Synthetic Biologics: Product Portfolio, Microbiome Therapeutics
 
Table 13.1 Microbiome Therapies: Distribution by Phase of Development
 
Table 13.2 Microbiome Therapies: Distribution by Type of Product
 
Table 13.3 Microbiome Therapies: Distribution by Geography
 
Table 13.4 Microbiome Therapies: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
 
Table 13.5 Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Therapeutic Area and Phase of Development
 
Table 13.6 Microbiome Therapeutics: Active Industry Players
 
Table 13.7 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Distribution by Numbers of Products
 
Table 13.8 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Distribution by Phase of Development
 
Table 13.9 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Active Industry Players
 
Table 13.10 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Distribution by Geography
 
Table 13.11 Probiotic and Prebiotic Drugs: Active Industry Players
 
Table 13.12 Clostridium difficile Infections (CDI): Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
 
Table 13.13 Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
 
Table 13.14 Diabetes: Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
 
Table 13.15 Number of Funding Instances by Year, 2005 Onwards
 
Table 13.16 Amount Invested by Year, 2005 Onwards
 
Table 13.17 Funding Instances: Distribution by Type, 2005-2015
 
Table 13.18 Funding Instances: Distribution by Total Amount Invested, 2005-2015 (USD Million)
 
Table 13.19 Most Active Players: Distribution by Number of Funding Instances, 2005-2015
 
Table 13.20 Most Active VC Firms/Investors: Distribution by Number of Instances, 2005-2015
 
Table 13.21 Funding Instances: Distribution by Type of Application
 
Table 13.22 Funding Instances: Distribution by Type of Product
 
Table 13.23 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Year
 
Table 13.24 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Type of Application
 
Table 13.25 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Type of Therapeutic Product
 
Table 13.26 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Type of Model
 
Table 13.27 Recent Collaborations: Distribution by Company
 
Table 13.28 Microbiome Therapeutics Market Forecast (USD Million), Short Term, Base Case, 2015-2022
 
Table 13.29 Microbiome Therapeutics Market Forecast (USD Million), Short Term, Conservative Case, 2015-2022
 
Table 13.30 Microbiome Therapeutics Market Forecast (USD Million), Short Term, Optimistic Case, 2015-2022
 
Table 13.31 Microbiome Therapeutics Market Forecast (USD Million), Mid-Long Term, Base Case, 2022-2030
 
Table 13.32 Microbiome Therapeutics Market Forecast (USD Million), Mid-Long Term, Conservative Case, 2022-2030
 
Table 13.33 Microbiome Therapeutics Market Forecast (USD Million), Mid-Long Term, Optimistic Case, 2022-2030
 
Table 13.34 Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Therapeutic Area, 2025, 2030
 
Table 13.35 Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Function, 2030
 
Table 13.36 OpenBiome: Revenues 2014, Distribution by Different Segments (USD Million)
 
Table 13.37 Microbiome Therapeutics Market (USD million), 2015, 2022, 2030
 

 

The following companies and institutes have been mentioned in this report.

  1. 4D Pharma
  2. AbbVie
  3. ActoGeniX
  4. Admera Health
  5. Advanced Technology Ventures
  6. Advancing Bio
  7. AgBiome
  8. AOBiome
  9. APC Microbiome Institute
  10. Assembly Biosciences
  11. Avid Biotics
  12. Azitra
  13. Baylor College of Medicine
  14. Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  15. Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
  16. BioAster Technology Research Institute
  17. BioBalance Corporation
  18. Biocartis
  19. BioConsortia
  20. BioGaia
  21. Biomecite Diagnostics
  22. Boston Children's Hospital
  23. Boston Medical Center
  24. Brigham and Women's Hospital
  25. Bright Medicine Clinic
  26. Broad Institute
  27. BTER Foundation
  28. C3 Jian
  29. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (CSMC)
  30. Center for Disease Control and Prevention
  31. Cipac Therapeutics
  32. c-LECta
  33. Cleveland Clinic
  34. Companion PBx
  35. Concorde Medical Group
  36. Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA)
  37. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation(CSIRO)
  38. Dairy Innovation Australia  Limited (DIAL)
  39. Da Volterra
  40. Danisco
  41. Debiopharm
  42. Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
  43. Dermala
  44. Duke University
  45. Enso Ventures
  46. Enterologics
  47. Enterome BioScience
  48. Epibiome
  49. Epiva Therapeutics
  50. Evelo Therapeutics
  51. Evolve Biosystems
  52. Evotec
  53. ExeGi Pharma
  54. Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)
  55. Flagship Ventures
  56. Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO)
  57. FUJIFILM Diosynth Biotechnologies
  58. Gallinee
  59. Genetic Analysis
  60. Genewiz
  61. GMU Microbiome Analysis Center (MBAC)
  62. GT Biologics
  63. Gustave Roussy
  64. Hadassah Medical Center
  65. Hospital Oberndorf
  66. Human Longevity
  67. Hy Laboratories
  68. Institute of Cardio metabolism and Nutrition (ICAN)
  69. Igen Biotech Group
  70. Illumina Accelerator
  71. Immune Biologics
  72. Immuron
  73. Indiana University
  74. Intrexon
  75. Inocucor Technologies
  76. INRA National Institute for Agronomic Research
  77. Inserm
  78. Institut De Recherche Pour Le Developent (IRD)
  79. Institut Merieux
  80. Institute for Biomedical Research Dr JosepTrueta of Girona
  81. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)
  82. J. Craig Venter Institute
  83. Janssen
  84. Johnson & Johnson Innovation Center
  85. Kindstar Global
  86. KOLUPOHAKU TECHNOLOGIES (KPT)
  87. Lille Teaching Hospital (CHRU)
  88. Lundbeckfond Ventures
  89. MaaT Pharma
  90. Macau University of Science and Technology
  91. Manzo Pharmaceuticals
  92. Matatu
  93. Mayo Clinic
  94. MBcure 
  95. Medical University Innsbruck
  96. Merck
  97. Metabiomics
  98. Metabogen
  99. Metabolon
  100. Metanome
  101. Metrodora Therapeutics
  102. Microbiome
  103. Microbiome Diagnostics
  104. MicroBiome Therapeutics
  105. Microbiota Company
  106. MiOmics
  107. Miyarisan Pharmaceutical
  108. Monarch Labs
  109. Monash University
  110. MonterFiore Medical Research Center of Connecticut
  111. Morgenthaler
  112. MyBiotics
  113. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
  114. National Health Service (NHS)
  115. National Institute of Allergic and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
  116. National Institute of Health (NIH)
  117. NIZO Food Research
  118. Novartis
  119. OmniBiome Therapeutics
  120. One Way Liver
  121. OpenBiome
  122. OptiBiotix Health
  123. Oragenics
  124. Osel
  125. OxThera
  126. Pasteur Institute
  127. Pfizer
  128. Pivot Bio
  129. Prev AbR
  130. Procarta Biosystems
  131. PureFlora
  132. Quorum Innovations
  133. Rebiotix
  134. Ritter Pharmaceuticals
  135. Rush University Medical Center
  136. Second Genome
  137. Sen Nuo Wei Biotechnology
  138. Seres Therapeutics
  139. Servier
  140. Seventure
  141. Shire
  142. Shoreline Biome
  143. Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals
  144. SporeGen
  145. Swecure
  146. Symberix
  147. Symbiota
  148. Symbiotix Biotherapies
  149. Synlogic
  150. Synthetic Biologics
  151. TargEDys
  152. Therapeutic Solutions International
  153. TriPhase Pharmaceuticals
  154. Universal Stabilisation Technologies
  155. Universite Pierre Et Marie Curie (UPMC)
  156. University of California, San Diego (UCSD)
  157. University of Chicago
  158. University of Guelph
  159. University of Maryland (UM) Ventures
  160. University of Rome Tor Vergata
  161. University of Virginia
  162. UAS Labs
  163. Vaiomer
  164. Vedanta Biosciences
  165. Virginia Commonwealth University
  166. ViroPharma Incorporated
  167. Vithera Pharmaceuticals
  168. VSL Pharmaceuticals
  169. Washington University School of Medicine
  170. Wavepoint Ventures
  171. Weizmann Institute
  172. Whole Biome
  173. World Gastroenterology Organisation (WGO)
  174. World Health Organisation (WHO)
  175. Wyss Institute
  176. Xycrobe Therapeutics
  177. Yakult Honsha

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