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Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Market (2nd Edition), 2017-2030

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  1. Close to 67% of the microbiome therapeutic products are in preclinical stage of development while seven products are in advanced stages (phase II/III and above). These include (in alphabetical order) B244 (AOBiome), HOST-G904 (HOST Therabiomics), Oxabact® (OxThera), RBX2660 (Rebiotix), RP-G28 (Ritter Pharmaceuticals), SER-109 (Seres Therapeutics) and SYN-010 (Synthetic Biologics).
  2. The innovation in this market is largely driven by smaller players, most of which are start-ups. Some of the start-ups involved in the development of microbiome therapeutics include (in alphabetical order) Axial Biotherapeutics, Azitra, ClostraBio, Evelo Biosciences, HOST Therabiomics, MicroViable Therapeutics and Siolta Therapeutics. In addition, this domain has witnessed the establishment of several university spin-offs; examples include (in alphabetical order), A-mansia (University catholique de Louvain and Wageningen University), Nubiyota (University of Guelph) and Symberix (University of North Carolina).
  3. In addition to the start-ups, some large and mid-sized companies are driving the development of microbiome based therapies. Examples of the large and mid-sized companies that are active in this field are (in alphabetical order) Assembly Biosciences, Biose, Igen Biotech, Leadiant Biosciences, Merck, Novartis, OxThera and Seres Therapeutics. Some of the other large pharmaceutical players, such as Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer and Roche, have been actively funding the initiatives of companies engaged in development of microbiome therapeutics.
  4. Several industry and non-industry players are contributing to the development of the FMT pipeline. Currently, FMTs are approved for the treatment of recurrent CDI (not responding to standard care). Prominent players that are developing FMTs include OpenBiome, Bright Medicine Clinic and Advancing Bio.
  5. Close to 20 microbiome based diagnostics are already available / under development in the market; these are capable of diagnosing IBS and dysbiosis of the gut. Examples of companies that have a diagnostic product available in the market include (in alphabetical order) Genetic Analysis, Genova Diagnostics, IS-diagnostics and Wellmicro. Other prominent players involved in this segment include (in alphabetical order) Enterome bioscience, C3J Therapautics and Vaiomer.
  6. Over 115 funding instances to support the development of microbiome therapeutics, diagnostic tests and FMTs have been reported between 2011 and May 2017. 49% of the total investment is in the form of venture capital financing; Seventure Partners has emerged as one of the prominent investors in this domain. In addition, 26% of the funding instances were related to seed, debt financing and grants. In the given period, three companies in this domain went public; these include Seres Therapeutics (2015, USD 139.3 million), Ritter Pharmaceuticals (2015, USD 20 million) and 4D Pharma (2014, USD 27.6 million).
  7. Close to 100 partnerships were inked during the period 2013 to May 2017. Of these, approximately 60% were signed for early R&D activities. Other popular types of collaborations in this domain include licensing agreements (product / technology) (14%), followed by mergers and acquisitions (9%). Recent examples of mergers and acquisitions include Mirna Therapeutics (Synlogic, May 2017), Epiva Biosciences (Evelo Sciences, July 2016) and Tucana Health (4D Pharma, April 2016).
  8. Overall, the microbiome therapeutics and diagnostics market is anticipated to grow at a healthy pace. Of the total market, the therapeutics segment is expected to occupy a share of close to 79% (in 2030), growing at an annualized growth rate of 84% between 2019 and 2030. As more microbiome therapeutics move to higher phases of development, the combined contribution of probiotic drugs and prebiotic drugs is likely to be close to 48% of the total market. This will be driven by the likely approval of a number of clinical stage products currently in the development pipeline.
  9. GI disorders is likely to be the key focus of developers in the short-midterm (close to 60% share by 2025). However, the next wave of growth is expected to be led by developments focused on products targeting metabolic disorders (including diabetes, NASH, lactose intolerance) and oncological disorders; products being developed for these therapeutic areas are expected to be approved and achieve wider adoption amongst the patient populations; by 2030, we expect metabolic and oncological disorders to contribute a share of 44% and 10%, respectively, of the total market.

Overview

Microbiome therapeutics represent a new frontier in the field of medicine. The human microbiome is characterized by more than 100 trillion commensal, symbiotic and pathogenic microorganisms that colonize the gut, mouth, skin and various other parts of the body. Majority of these microorganisms benefit humans by supplementing them with traits that they do not otherwise possess; these include the capability to metabolize complex carbohydrates and prevention of growth of pathogens. However, some of these microorganisms are pathogenic in nature or have the capability to transform into disease-causing agents. In fact, an imbalance in the human microbiome, or dysbiosis, has been shown to be associated with various diseases, such as Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diabetes and other chronic conditions.

In addition to the existing treatment plans for the above mentioned health conditions, approaches related to modifying the natural microbiome of an individual, either by adding / removing individual microbes or entire microbial communities, have been shown to demonstrate significant health benefits. Such therapies offer unique advantages over traditional small molecules or biologics based treatment regimens. In fact, one of the driving forces for developing microbiome therapeutics is to avoid the harmful side-effects of antibiotic therapies; some of these side-effects include disruption of protective / beneficial microbiota and the generation of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic strains.

Currently, there are many probiotics, prebiotics, and medical foods and supplements that are commercially available as over the counter (OTC) products. Such products claim to be capable of preventing a number of diseases by restoring the human microbiome to its natural (normal) state; however, these products cannot be used as a replacement for medication or as a treatment option. At the same time, several drug / therapy candidates that claim to be capable of modifying / manipulating the microbiome in order to provide therapeutic benefits are being developed as prescription drugs. With a rich development pipeline, microbiome therapeutics has managed to capture the interest of several strategic investors and venture capital firms. We believe, if approved, these therapeutics are likely to change the treatment modalities for several indications across GI disorders, metabolic disorders, dermatological indications and inflammatory diseases.

 

Scope of the Report

The ‘Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Market (2nd Edition), 2017-2030’ report provides a comprehensive study on the current landscape and the future outlook of the growing pipeline of products (therapeutics and diagnostics) in this area. The rising popularity and potential within this domain can be correlated with the exponential increase in the number of citations of the term microbiome on PubMed, the popular scientific literature resource; the number increased from 959 citations in 2003 to 33,809 citations in the first half of 2017.

While the field has captured the interest of several companies and investors alike, no approved microbiome drugs are yet available in the market; FMT is currently the only commercially available microbiome based therapy. In addition, a few microbiome diagnostic tests are commercially available for the detection of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and inflammatory diseases. Having said that, the development pipeline of microbiome therapeutics has several promising candidates that are likely to result in commercial success stories in the foreseen future.

The report is primarily focused on prescription drugs, probiotic drugs and prebiotic drugs, which are being developed in this domain. In addition, we have captured FMT products and screening / diagnostic tests that are already available / under development. During the course of our study, we identified over 170 microbiome therapeutics and close to 25 microbiome diagnostics across various stages of development; majority of the therapeutic products are currently in early phases of development. Amongst other elements, the report features:

  • A review of the current status of the market with respect to the microbiome therapeutics pipeline, providing information on the developers, phase of development (clinical, preclinical or discovery stage) of various product candidates, product type, target indication(s) and therapeutic areas. In addition, the report highlights the growing pipeline of microbiome based diagnostics and FMTs.
  • An assessment of the emerging role of big data in microbiome therapeutics, highlighting the development and implementation of various algorithms / tools to analyze data generated from research, in order to understand the relationship between the microbiome and the host.
  • A discussion on potential target disease indications across popular therapeutic areas includingmetabolic disorders, GI disorders, oncological diseases, dermatological diseases, inflammatory disorders, and women disorders. It includes detailed disease descriptions, epidemiology, current treatment plans, side effects of current treatment options and upcoming microbiome therapies.
  • Elaborate profiles of clinical stage companies (selected based on the number of pipeline products and year of establishment); each profile features an overview of the company, its financial performance, product portfolio, detailed information on advanced stage pipeline candidates (featuring a drug overview, clinical development plan and clinical trial results) and a comprehensive future outlook.
  • A detailed analysis of the database presented as three schematic representations; a world map depicting the most active geographies in terms of the presence of companies developing microbiome therapeutics, a heat map featuring the distribution of companies on the basis of their location, number of employees and phase of development of pipeline products, and a grid analysis of the microbiome therapeutics pipeline, wherein individual product candidates have been compared according to their respective target therapeutic areas and phases of development.
  • A social media analysis on the emerging trends and popularity of microbiome therapeutics on the social media platform, Twitter.
  • An analysis of the partnerships that have been established in the recent past, covering R&D collaborations, license agreements, mergers and acquisitions, manufacturing and services agreements, and other relevant agreements.
  • An analysis of the investments made at various stages of development, such as seed financing, venture capital financing, debt financing, grants, and capital raised from IPOs and subsequent offerings, received by companies that are focused in this area.
  • A detailed discussion on the various steps involved in the development and manufacturing of microbiome therapeutics, featuring information on various players that offer contract manufacturing services, or have in-house manufacturing capabilities, and those that offer other contract services, such as screening, sequencing and characterization of the microbiome, related to microbiome therapeutics.

One of the key objectives of the report was to understand the primary growth drivers and estimate the future size of the market. Based on parameters, such as target consumer segments, likely adoption rates and expected pricing, we have provided an informed estimate of the likely evolution of the market in the short to mid-term and long term, for the period 2017-2030. The research, analysis and insights presented in this report include potential sales of FMT therapies, drugs in late stages of development and diagnostics that are already approved, and those that are likely to receive approval in the near future. The base year for the report is 2017. To account for the uncertainties associated with the development of novel therapeutic classes and to add robustness to our model, we have provided three forecast scenarios portraying the conservative, base and optimistic tracks of the market’s evolution.

The opinions and insights presented in the report were influenced by discussions with senior stakeholders in the industry. These include James Burges (Executive Director, OpenBiome), Veronika Oudova (Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer, S-Biomedic), Nikole E Kimes (Co-founder and Vice President, Siolta Therapeutics), Lee Jones (President and Chief Executive Officer, Rebiotix) and Colleen Cutcliffe (Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer, Whole Biome), JP Benya (Vice President, Business Development, Assembly Biosciences), Pierre-Alain Bandinelli (Chief Business Officer, Da Volterra), Gregory J Kuehn (Vice President, Business Development and Marketing, Metabiomics)and  Dr. Mark Heiman (Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President, Research, MicroBiome Therapeutics). All actual figures have been sourced and analyzed from publicly available information forums and primary research discussions. Financial figures mentioned in this report are in USD, unless otherwise specified.

Contents

Chapter 2  provides an executive summary of the insights captured in our research. It offers a high level view on the likely evolution of the microbiome therapeutics market in the short-mid and long term.

Chapter 3  provides a general introduction to the underlying concepts on human microbiota. In addition to reviewing the functions of the microbiota, we have also discussed key aspects of the Human Microbiome Project and the diseases caused by an imbalance in the microbiome. Further, we have discussed the various types of probiotic and prebiotic drugs that are under development. In addition, the chapter provides an overview of the regulatory landscape for live biotherapeutic products (LBPs), which are likely to be approved in the coming years.

Chapter 4  includes information on over 170 product candidates that are currently in different stages of development (both clinical and preclinical / discovery). It features a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the pipeline molecules, highlighting the key therapeutic areas, product type, phases of development, geographical locations of developers, and leading players in the field of microbiome therapeutics.

Chapter 5  provides detailed company and drug profiles of active players ( selected based on the number of pipeline products and year of establishment ) in the microbiome therapeutics market. Each company profile includes an overview of the company, its financial performance ( wherever available ) and details of its product portfolio. In addition, we have provided detailed profiles of advanced phase drugs (phase II and above); each drug profile contains information on its clinical development status, clinical trial endpoints and key clinical trial results.

Chapter 6  provides details on the microbiome diagnostics pipeline, featuring a comprehensive analysis of the various types of products that are being developed within this segment of the microbiome market. The chapter also contains brief profiles of various microbiome diagnostics developers covering information, such as technology platforms and products being developed by these companies.

Chapter 7  presents a brief history of FMTs, a review of the current market landscape (in terms of industry pipeline and non-industry clinical studies) of such products, and details on administration procedures and clinical relevance. In addition, the chapter provides an overview of the regulatory landscape related to these therapies.  Further, it includes brief profiles on the various stool banks that have been established over the years.

Chapter 8  presents information on the role of big data and its applications in the healthcare industry. Further, the chapter elaborates on the use of big data analytics to understand microbiome consortium and to design microbiome based therapeutics. It also contains brief profiles of companies offering big data services related to microbiome.

Chapter 9  highlights the potential target indications (segregated by therapeutic areas) for microbiome therapeutics that are currently the prime focus of companies developing these drugs. These therapeutic areas include  (in alphabetical order)  dermatological diseases, GI disorders, inflammatory disorders, metabolic disorders, oncology, and women disorders. The chapter also provides details on disease epidemiology, currently available treatment options for each indication and their likely side effects.

Chapter 10  presents details on various investments and grants received by companies that are focused in this domain. It also includes an analysis of the funding instances that have taken place in the period between 2011 and 2017 (May), highlighting the growing interest of the venture capital community and other strategic investors in this market.

Chapter 11  features an elaborate discussion and analysis of the collaborations and partnerships that have been forged amongst players in this market. We have also discussed the various partnership models and the most common forms of deals / agreements that have been established in the period between 2013 and 2017 (May).

Chapter 12  provides details on various players that offer contract manufacturing services for microbiome based products, or possess the necessary capabilities and infrastructure to manufacture such products in-house. The chapter also provides information on companies that provide other affiliated contract services, such as screening, sequencing and characterization of the microbiome.  

Chapter 13  highlights the likely growth of the market of microbiome therapeutics, diagnostics and FMTs from 2017-2030. We have segregated the financial opportunity in this domain by applications (therapeutics, diagnostics and FMTs) product types (probiotic drugs, prebiotic drugs and other drugs), key therapeutic areas, geographies and leading players. The projections related to the market’s future are backed by robust data and credible inputs from primary research. Due to the uncertain nature of the market, we have presented three different tracks representing conservative, base and optimistic scenarios of the evolution of the market.

Chapter 14  is a compilation of key insights gathered from the study. It features a schematic representation on a world map, highlighting the key regional hubs driving the research on microbiome therapeutics. Further, we have provided a heat map analysis of the distribution of companies involved in this field, based on their location (continent-wise distribution), number of employees and phase of development of pipeline molecules (clinical and / or preclinical). The chapter also features a comprehensive grid analysis of the various therapeutic product candidates, highlighting their respective target therapeutic areas and phases of development. In addition, the chapter includes a discussion on the emerging trends and the growing popularity of microbiome therapeutics, as observed on the social media platform, Twitter, over the period between January 2013 and June 2017.

Chapter 15  is a summary of the overall report, featuring a list of key takeaways from the research and our independent opinion on the nature and potential of the microbiome therapeutics market.

Chapter 16  is a collection of interview transcripts of the discussions that were held with key stakeholders in this market. These include James Burges (Executive Director, OpenBiome), Veronika Oudova (Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer, S-Biomedic), Nikole E Kimes (Co-founder and Vice President, Siolta Therapeutics), Lee Jones (President and Chief Executive Officer, Rebiotix) and Colleen Cutcliffe (Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer, Whole Biome), JP Benya (Vice President, Business Development, Assembly Biosciences), Pierre-Alain Bandinelli (Chief Business Officer, Da Volterra), Gregory J Kuehn (Vice President, Business Development and Marketing, Metabiomics) and Dr. Mark Heiman (Chief Scientific Officer and Vice President, Research, MicroBiome Therapeutics).

Chapter 17  is an appendix, which provides a list of microbiome based probiotic supplements, medical foods and consumer products.

Chapter 18  is an appendix, which provides tabulated data and numbers for all the figures provided in the report.

Chapter 19  is an appendix, which provides the list of companies and organizations mentioned in the report. 

Table of Contents

1. PREFACE
1.1. Scope of the Report
1.2. Research Methodology
1.3. Chapter Outlines
 
2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
 
3. INTRODUCTION
3.1. Context and Background
3.2. Defining Microbiota and Microbiome
3.2.1. Discovery of the Human Microbiome
3.2.2. Functions of the Human Microbiome
3.3. The Gut Flora
3.3.1. Physiological Role of Gut Flora
3.3.2. Factors Affecting the Gut Flora
3.3.2.1. Age and Pregnancy
3.3.2.2. Use of Antibiotics
3.3.2.3. Stress
3.3.2.4. Intake of Certain Food Products
3.3.2.5. Lifestyle
 
3.4. Relationship between the Human Microbiome and Disease
3.4.1. Obesity
3.4.2. Type-2 Diabetes
3.4.3. Cancer
3.4.4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
3.4.5. Parkinson’s Disease
3.4.6. Other Disease Indications
 
3.5. Impact of Microbiota on Drug Pharmacokinetics
3.6. Impact of Microbiota on Clinical Outcomes
3.7. The Human Microbiome Project
3.7.1. Project Approach
3.7.2. Project Initiatives
3.7.3. Project Achievements
 
3.8. Microbiome Therapeutics
3.8.1. Probiotics
3.8.1.1. Beneficial Strains
3.8.1.2. Key Therapeutic Areas
3.8.1.3. Side Effects
3.8.2. Prebiotics
3.8.2.1. Source of Prebiotics
3.8.2.2. Types of Prebiotics
3.8.2.3. Key Therapeutic Areas
3.8.2.4. Side Effects
 
3.9. Regulatory Guidelines for Live Biotherapeutic Products (LBPs)
 
4. COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE
4.1. Chapter Overview
4.2. Microbiome Therapeutics: A Robust Development Pipeline
4.3. Pipeline Analysis
4.3.1. Distribution by Phase of Development
4.3.2. Distribution by Type of Product
4.3.3. Distribution by Geography
4.3.4. Distribution by Therapeutic Area
4.3.5. Active Industry Players
 
5. COMPANY PROFILES
5.1. Chapter Overview
5.2. 4D Pharma
5.2.1. Company Overview
5.2.2. Financial Performance
5.2.3. Product Portfolio
5.2.4. Future Outlook
 
5.3. AOBiome
5.3.1. Company Overview
5.3.2. Financial Performance
5.3.3. Product Portfolio
5.3.3.1. B244: Key Insights
5.3.4. Future Outlook
 
5.4. Assembly Biosciences
5.4.1. Company Overview
5.4.2. Financial Performance
5.4.3. Product Portfolio
5.4.4. Future Outlook
 
5.5. C3J Therapeutics
5.5.1. Company Overview
5.5.2. Financial Performance
5.5.3. Product Portfolio
5.5.3.1. C16G2: Key Insights
5.5.3.2. Other Pipeline Drugs
5.5.4. Future Outlook
 
5.6. Enterome bioscience
5.6.1. Company Overview
5.6.2. Financial Performance
5.6.3. Product Portfolio
5.6.3.1. EB8018: Key Insights
5.6.3.2. Other Pipeline Drugs
5.6.4. Future Outlook
 
5.7. HOST Therabiomics
5.7.1. Company Overview
5.7.2. Product Portfolio
5.7.2.1. HOST-G904: Key Insights
5.7.2.2. Other Pipeline Drugs
5.7.3. Future Outlook
 
5.8. Osel
5.8.1. Company Overview
5.8.2. Product Portfolio
5.8.2.1. Lactin-V: Key Insights
5.8.2.2. Other Pipeline Drugs
5.8.3. Future Outlook
 
5.9. Rebiotix
5.9.1. Company Overview
5.9.2. Product Portfolio
5.9.2.1. RBX2660: Key Insights
5.9.2.2. Other Pipeline Products
5.9.3. Future Outlook
 
5.10. Ritter Pharmaceuticals
5.10.1. Company Overview
5.10.2. Financial Performance
5.10.3. Product Portfolio
5.10.3.1. RP-G28: Key Insights
5.10.4. Future Outlook
 
5.11. Second Genome
5.11.1. Company Overview
5.11.2. Financial Performance
5.11.3. Second Genome Solutions
5.11.4. Product Portfolio
5.11.4.1. SGM-1019: Key Insights
5.11.5. Future Outlook
 
5.12. Seres Therapeutics
5.12.1. Company Overview
5.12.2. Financial Performance
5.12.3. Product Portfolio
5.12.3.1. SER-109: Key Insights
5.12.3.2. SER-262: Key Insights
5.12.3.3. SER-287: Key Insights
5.12.3.4. Other Pipeline Drugs
5.12.4. Future Outlook
 
5.13. Synlogic
5.13.1. Company Overview
5.13.2. Financial Performance
5.13.3. Technology Platform
5.13.4. Product Portfolio
5.13.5. Future Outlook
 
5.14. Synthetic Biologics
5.14.1. Company Overview
5.14.2. Financial Performance
5.14.3. Product Portfolio
5.14.3.1. SYN-010: Key Insights
5.14.3.2. SYN-004: Key Insights
5.14.3.3. Other Pipeline Drugs
5.14.4. Future Outlook
 
6. MICROBIOME DIAGNOSTICS
6.1. Chapter Overview
6.2. Introduction
6.3. Microbiome Diagnostics and Next Generation Sequencing
6.4. Competitive Landscape
6.4.1. Analysis by Phase of Development
6.4.2. Analysis by Geography
6.4.3. Analysis by Therapeutic Area
6.5. Company Profiles
6.5.1. Enterome bioscience
6.5.2. Vaiomer
 
7. FECAL MICROBIOTA THERAPY
7.1. Introduction
7.2. FMT: Historical Overview
7.3. FMT: Administration Procedure and Clinical Relevance
7.3.1. Donor Selection
7.3.2. FMT Procedure
7.3.3. Proposed Benefits
7.3.4. Consequences and Adverse Events
7.3.5. Clinical Guidelines
7.4. FMT: Regulatory Guidelines
7.5. Insurance Coverage
 
7.6. Competitive Landscape
7.6.1. Pipeline (Industry Participants)
7.6.2. Clinical Trials (Non-Industry Participants)
7.6.2.1. Clinical Trials: Analysis by Trial Initiation Period
7.6.2.2. Clinical Trials: Analysis by Phase of Development
7.6.2.3. Clinical Trials: Analysis by Recruitment Status
7.6.2.4. Clinical Trials: Analysis by Indication
 
7.7. Stool Banks: Key Players
7.7.1. OpenBiome
7.7.1.1. Overview
7.7.1.2. Financial Performance
7.7.1.3. Fecal Microbiota Preparations
 
7.7.2. AdvancingBio
7.7.2.1. Overview
7.7.2.2. Fecal Microbiota Preparations
 
7.7.3. Asia Microbiota Bank
7.7.3.1. Overview
7.7.3.2. Human Microbiota Transfer (HMT): Next Generation FMT
 
8. BIG DATA AND MICROBIOME THERAPEUTICS
8.1. Chapter Overview
8.2. Big Data
8.3. Internet of Things
8.4. Interest in Big Data: A Growing Trend
8.5. Application Areas of Big Data
8.6. Big Data in Microbiome Research
8.6.1. Overview
8.6.2. Challenges in Microbiome and Big Data Management
8.6.3. National Microbiome Data Center
 
8.7. Big Data for Microbiome Research: Key Players
8.7.1. Human Longevity
8.7.1.1. Overview
8.7.1.2. Technology and Services
8.7.1.3. Other Information
 
8.7.2. Resilient Biotics
8.7.2.1. Overview
8.7.2.2. Technology and Services
 
8.7.3. Resphera Biosciences
8.7.3.1. Overview
8.7.3.2. Technology and Services
 
9. KEY THERAPEUTIC AREAS
9.1. Chapter Overview
9.2. Metabolic Diseases
9.2.1. Diabetes
9.2.1.1. Disease Description
9.2.1.2. Epidemiology
9.2.1.3. Current Treatment Options
9.2.1.4. Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
9.2.1.5. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.2.2. Obesity
9.2.2.1. Disease Description
9.2.2.2. Epidemiology
9.2.2.3. Current Treatment Options
9.2.2.4. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.2.3. Lactose Intolerance
9.2.3.1. Disease Description
9.2.3.2. Epidemiology
9.2.3.3. Current Treatment Options
9.2.3.4. Microbiome Therapies for
 
9.2.4. Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)
9.2.4.1. Disease Description
9.2.4.2. Epidemiology
9.2.4.3. Current Treatment Options
9.2.4.4. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.2.5. Primary Hyperoxaluria
9.2.5.1. Disease Description
9.2.5.2. Epidemiology
9.2.5.3. Current Treatment Options
9.2.5.4. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.3. Gastrointestinal (GI) Disorders
9.3.1. Clostridium difficile Infections (CDIs)
9.3.1.1. Disease Description
9.3.1.2. Epidemiology
9.3.1.3. Current Treatment Options
9.3.1.4. Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
9.3.1.5. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.3.2. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
9.3.2.1. Disease Description
9.3.2.2. Epidemiology
9.3.2.3. Current Treatment Options
9.3.2.4. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.4. Oncological Indications
9.4.1. Lung Cancer
9.4.1.1. Disease Description
9.4.1.2. Epidemiology
9.4.1.3. Current Treatment Options
9.4.1.4. Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
9.4.1.5. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.4.2. Colorectal Cancer
9.4.2.1. Disease Description
9.4.2.2. Epidemiology
9.4.2.3. Current Treatment Options
9.4.2.4. Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
9.4.2.5. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.5. Dermatological Disorders
9.5.1. Acne Vulgaris
9.5.1.1. Disease Description
9.5.1.2. Epidemiology
9.5.1.3. Current Treatment Options
9.5.1.4. Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
9.5.1.5. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.6. Inflammatory Diseases
9.6.1. Ulcerative Colitis
9.6.1.1. Disease Description
9.6.1.2. Epidemiology
9.6.1.3. Current Treatment Options
9.6.1.4. Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
9.6.1.5. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.6.2. Crohn’s Disease
9.6.2.1. Disease Description
9.6.2.2. Epidemiology
9.6.2.3. Current Treatment Options
9.6.2.4. Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
9.6.2.5. Microbiome Therapies
 
9.7. Women Disorders
9.7.1. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)
9.7.1.1. Disease Description
9.7.1.2. Epidemiology
9.7.1.3. Current Treatment Options
9.7.1.4. Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
9.7.1.5. Microbiome Therapies
 
10. VENTURE CAPITAL FUNDING
10.1. Chapter Overview
10.2. Types of Funding
10.3. Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Funding Instances
10.4. Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Analysis
10.4.1. Analysis by Cumulative Number of Instances
10.4.2. Analysis by Leading Players
10.4.3. Analysis by Type of Product
10.5. Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Most Active Investors
 
11. PARTNERSHIPS AND COLLABORATIONS
11.1. Chapter Overview
11.2. Partnership Models
11.3. Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Instances
11.4. Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Analysis
11.4.1. Analysis by Year of Partnership
11.4.2. Analysis by Type of Partnership
11.4.3. Analysis by Therapeutic Area
11.4.4. Analysis by Type of Product
11.5. Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Most Active Companies
 
12. CONTRACT SERVICES FOR MICROBIOME THERAPEUTICS
12.1. Chapter Overview
12.2. Key Manufacturing Steps
12.3. Key Manufacturing Challenges
12.4. Contract and In-house Manufacturers
12.5. Contract Research Organizations
12.6. Recent Collaborations
 
13. MARKET SIZE AND OPPORTUNITY ANALYSIS
13.1. Chapter Overview
13.2. Forecast Methodology
13.3. Input Data and Key Assumptions
13.4. Overall Microbiome Market, 2017-2030
13.5. Overall Microbiome Market: Distribution by Application
13.6. Overall Microbiome Market: Distribution by Geography
13.7. Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Product Type
13.8. Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Leading Players
13.9. Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
 
14. KEY INSIGHTS
14.1. Chapter Overview
14.2. Microbiome Therapeutics: Regional Landscape
14.3. Microbiome Therapeutics: Heat Map Analysis
14.4. Microbiome Therapeutics: Grid Analysis
14.5. Microbiome Therapeutics: Social Media Analysis
14.5.1. Yearly Trends on Twitter
14.5.2. Popular Keywords on Twitter
 
15. CONCLUSION
15.1. Microfloral Imbalance is Suspected to be the Root Cause of a Number of Chronic Disorders, Antibiotic Overuse is the Primary Cause of Microbiota Disruption
15.2. Microbiome Therapies Aid in Preserving Beneficial Microflora, Thereby Helping in Disease Prevention and Cure
15.3. Start-ups, Assisted by Both Public and Private Investors, are Spearheading the Innovation in this Domain
15.4. Growing Number of Partnerships, Primarily to Support R&D Activities, are Indicative of a Lucrative Future Potential
15.4. Active Involvement of Regulatory Authorities will Act as a Key Enabler for Expedited Approval and Increased Market Penetration

15.6. Backed by a Robust Pipeline, the Market is Poised to Revolutionize the Treatment of a Myriad of Clinical Conditions and Witness Remarkable Growth in the Long Term
 
16. INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPTS
16.1. Chapter Overview
16.2. James Burgess, Executive Director, OpenBiome
16.3. Veronika Oudova, Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer, S-Biomedic
16.4. Nikole E Kimes, Co-founder and Vice President, Siolta Therapeutics
16.5. Colleen Cutcliffe, Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer, Whole Biome
16.6. JP Benya, Vice President, Business Development, Assembly Biosciences
16.7. Pierre-Alain Bandinelli, Chief Business Officer, Da Volterra
16.8. Gregory J Kuehn, Vice President, Business Development and Marketing, Metabiomics
16.9. Mark Heiman, Vice President of Research and Chief Scientific Officer, MicroBiome Therapeutics
16.10. Lee Jones, President and Chief Executive Officer, Rebiotix
 
17. APPENDIX: LIST OF CONSUMER PRODUCTS, MEDICAL FOODS AND SUPPLEMENTS
 
18. APPENDIX: TABULATED DATA
 
19. APPENDIX: LIST OF COMPANIES AND ORGANIZATIONS

List of Figures

Figure 3.1  Factors Affecting the Gut Flora
Figure 3.2  Factors Affecting Gut Microbiota in Infants 
Figure 3.3  Interventions Influencing Gut Microbiota
Figure 3.4  Human Microbiome Project: Key Achievements
Figure 3.5  Types of Microbiome Therapeutics
Figure 3.6  Microbiome Therapeutics: Design Approaches
Figure 3.7  Probiotics: Health Benefits
Figure 3.8  Probiotic Drugs: Modes of Action
Figure 3.9  Probiotic Drugs: Overview of Beneficial Bacterial Strains
Figure 4.1  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Stage and Phase of Development
Figure 4.2  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Type of Product
Figure 4.3  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Geography
Figure 4.4  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
Figure 4.5  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Key Therapeutic Area and Phase of Development
Figure 4.6  Microbiome Therapeutics: Active Industry Players
Figure 5.1  Competitive Landscape of Players Established Between 1994 and 2009
Figure 5.2  Competitive Landscape of Players Established Between 2010 and 2016
Figure 5.3  4D Pharma: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.4  4D Pharma: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.5  AOBiome: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.6  AOBiome: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.7  B244: Clinical Trial Timeline
Figure 5.8  Assembly Biosciences: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.9  Assembly Biosciences: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.10  C3J Therapeutics: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.11  C3J Therapeutics: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.12  Oral Formulations of C16G2: Advantages
Figure 5.13  C16G2: Clinical Trial Timeline
Figure 5.14  Enterome bioscience: Funding Instances (EUR Million)
Figure 5.15  Enterome bioscience: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.16  HOST Therabiomics: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.17  Osel: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.18  LACTIN-V: Clinical Trial Timeline
Figure 5.19  Rebiotix: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.20  RBX2660: Clinical Trial Timeline
Figure 5.21  Ritter Pharmaceuticals: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.22  Ritter Pharmaceuticals: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.23  RP-G28: Clinical Trial Timeline
Figure 5.24  Second Genome: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.25  Second Genome Solutions: End-to-End Microbiome Profiling Program
Figure 5.26  Second Genome: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.27  Seres Therapeutics: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.28  Seres Therapeutics: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.29  SER-109: Clinical Trial Timeline
Figure 5.30  Synlogic: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.31  Synlogic: Components of Synthetic Biotic™
Figure 5.32  Synlogic: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.33  Synthetic Biologics: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Figure 5.34  Synthetic Biologics: Product Portfolio
Figure 5.35  SYN-010: Clinical Trial Timeline
Figure 5.36  SYN-004: Clinical Trial Timeline
Figure 6.1  16S rRNA Gene Sequence Analysis: Key Steps
Figure 6.2  Microbiome Diagnostics: Distribution by Phase of Development
Figure 6.3  Microbiome Diagnostics: Distribution by Geographical Location
Figure 6.4  Microbiome Diagnostics: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
Figure 7.1  Clinical Trials: Distribution by Trial Initiation Period (2013-2017)
Figure 7.2  Clinical Trials: Distribution by Phase of Development
Figure 7.3  Clinical Trials: Distribution by Recruitment Status
Figure 7.4  Clinical Trials: Distribution by Indication
Figure 7.5  OpenBiome: Revenues 2015, Distribution by Revenue Source (USD Million)
Figure 8.1  Big Data: The Three V’s
Figure 8.2  Internet of Things: Framework
Figure 8.3  Internet of Things: Applications in Healthcare
Figure 8.4  Big Data: Google Trends
Figure 8.5  Big Data: Application Areas
Figure 8.6  Big Data: Opportunities in Healthcare
Figure 8.7  Big Data: Key Benefits for Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology Products
Figure 8.8  Challenges in Microbiome and Big Data Management
Figure 9.1  CDIs: Distribution of Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
Figure 9.2  IBS: Distribution of Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
Figure 9.3  Ulcerative Colitis: Distribution of Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
Figure 9.4  Crohn’s Disease: Distribution of Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
Figure 10.1  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Cumulative Funding Instances, Pre-2011-2017
Figure 10.2  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Cumulative Funding Amount, Pre-2011-2017 (USD Million)
Figure 10.3  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Distribution by Type, Pre-2011-2017
Figure 10.4  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Distribution by Total Amount Invested, Pre-2011-2017 (USD Million)
Figure 10.5  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Distribution of Type of Funding Based on Amount Invested (USD Million)
Figure 10.6  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Leading Players 
Figure 10.7 Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Distribution by Type of Product
Figure 10.8  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Amount Invested by Type of Product and Type of Investment, Pre-2011–2017 (USD Million)
Figure 10.9  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Most Active Investors 
Figure 11.1  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Cumulative Trend (Pre-2013–2017)
Figure 11.2  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Distribution by Type of Partnership
Figure 11.3  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
Figure 11.4  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Distribution by Type of Product
Figure 11.5  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Distribution by Most Active Companies 
Figure 12.1  Manufacturing Microbiome Therapeutics: Key Steps
Figure 13.1  Overall Microbiome Market, 2017-2030 (USD Million)
Figure 13.2  Overall Microbiome Market: Distribution by Type of Application, 2017-2030 (USD Million)
Figure 13.3  Overall Microbiome Market: Distribution by Geography, 2020, 2025 and 2030 (USD Million)
Figure 13.4  Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Therapeutic Areas, 2017-2030 (USD Million)
Figure 13.5  Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Market Attractiveness Analysis by Therapeutic Area, 2023-2030
Figure 13.6  Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Product Type, 2020, 2025 and 2030 (USD Million)
Figure 13.7  Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Leading Players, 2020, 2025 and 2030 (USD Million)
Figure 14.1  Microbiome Therapeutics: Regional Landscape
Figure 14.2  Microbiome Therapeutics: Heat Map Analysis
Figure 14.3  Microbiome Therapeutics: Grid Analysis
Figure 14.4  Social Media Analysis: Yearly Trends on Twitter, January 2013-June 2017
Figure 14.5  Social Media Analysis: Word Cloud Analysis, January 2013-June 2017
Figure 15.1  Microbiome Therapeutics: Developer Landscape
Figure 15.2  Microbiome Therapeutics: Key Therapeutic Areas
Figure 15.3  Overall Microbiome Market: Conservative, Base and Optimistic Forecast Scenarios, 2017-2030 (USD Billion)

List of Tables

Table 3.1  Microbiota in the GI Tract
Table 3.2  Impact of Antibiotics on Intestinal Microflora
Table 3.3  Microorganisms Recognized as Class 1 Carcinogens by the IARC
Table 3.4  Relationship between Microbiome and Other Disease Indications
Table 3.5  Impact of Drug-Microbiome Interactions
Table 3.6  Foods Containing Prebiotics
Table 4.1  Microbiome Therapeutics: Clinical Pipeline
Table 4.2  Microbiome Therapeutics: Preclinical Pipeline
Table 4.3  Microbiome Therapeutics: Status Unknown
Table 5.1  B244: Clinical Trials
Table 5.2  B244: Clinical Trials Endpoints
Table 5.3  C16G2: Clinical Trials
Table 5.4  C16G2: Clinical Trials Endpoints
Table 5.5  HOST-G904: Clinical Trials
Table 5.6  LACTIN-V: Clinical Trials
Table 5.7  LACTIN-V: Clinical Trials Endpoints
Table 5.8  RBX2660: Clinical Trials
Table 5.9  RBX2660: Clinical Trials Endpoints
Table 5.10  RP-G28: Clinical Trials
Table 5.11  RP-G28: Clinical Trials Endpoints
Table 5.12  SER-109: Clinical Trials
Table 5.13  SER-109: Clinical Trials Endpoints
Table 5.14  SYN-010: Clinical Trials
Table 5.15  SYN-010: Clinical Trials Endpoints
Table 5.16  SYN-004: Clinical Trials
Table 5.17  SYN-004: Clinical Trials Endpoints
Table 6.1  Microbiome Diagnostics: Microbiome Testing Kits
Table 6.2  Microbiome Diagnostics: Development Pipeline
Table 7.1  FMT: Summary of Guidelines
Table 7.2  Summary of Insurance Coverage Payers
Table 7.3  FMT Therapies: Pipeline
Table 7.4  FMT: Clinical Trials Pipeline
Table 7.5  OpenBiome: Type of Formulations
Table 7.6  FMT and HMT: Differences in Processing
Table 8.1  Big Data and Microbiome: List of Companies
Table 8.2  Human Longevity: Partnerships and Collaborations
Table 9.1  Diabetes: Current Treatment Options
Table 9.2  Diabetes: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
Table 9.3  Diabetes: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.4  Obesity: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
Table 9.5  Obesity: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.6  Lactose Intolerance: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.7  NASH: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.8  Primary Hyperoxaluria: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.9  CDIs: Diagnostic Tests
Table 9.10  CDIs: Severity Scoring System and Treatment Options
Table 9.11  CDIs: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
Table 9.12  CDIs: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.13  IBS: Current Treatment Options
Table 9.14  IBS: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.15  Lung Cancer: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
Table 9.16  Lung Cancer: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.17  Colorectal Cancer: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
Table 9.18  Colorectal Cancer: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.19  Acne Vulgaris: Current Treatment Options
Table 9.20  Acne Vulgaris: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
Table 9.21  Acne Vulgaris: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.22  Ulcerative Colitis: Current Treatment Options
Table 9.23  Ulcerative Colitis: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
Table 9.24  Ulcerative Colitis: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.25  Crohn’s Disease: Current Treatment Options
Table 9.26  Crohn’s Disease: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options
Table 9.27  Crohn’s Disease: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 9.28  Bacterial Vaginosis: Current Treatment Options
Table 9.29  Bacterial Vaginosis: Side Effects of Current Treatment Options 
Table 9.30  Women Disorders: Microbiome Therapeutics Pipeline
Table 10.1  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Funding Instances, Pre-2011-2017
Table 10.2  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Types of Funding Instances, Pre-2011-2017
Table 11.1  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Instances
Table 12.1  Microbiome Therapeutics: Contract Manufacturers
Table 12.2  Microbiome Therapeutics: Contract Research Organizations
Table 13.1  Potential of Key Therapeutic Areas: Estimated Market Growth Rate
Table 13.2  Potential of Key Therapeutic Areas: Estimated Penetration (by 2030)
Table 18.1  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Stage and Phase of Development
Table 18.2  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Type of Product
Table 18.3  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Geography
Table 18.4  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
Table 18.5  Microbiome Therapeutics: Distribution by Key Therapeutic Area and Phase of Development
Table 18.6  Microbiome Therapeutics: Active Industry Players
Table 18.7  4D Pharma: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.8  AOBiome: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.9  Assembly Biosciences: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.10  C3J Therapeutics: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.11  Enterome bioscience: Funding Instances (EUR Million)
Table 18.12  Ritter Pharmaceuticals: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.13  Second Genome: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.14  Seres Therapeutics: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.15  Synlogic: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.16  Synthetic Biologics: Funding Instances (USD Million)
Table 18.17  Microbiome Diagnostics: Distribution by Phase of Development
Table 18.18  Microbiome Diagnostics: Distribution by Geographical Location
Table 18.19  Clinical Trials: Distribution by Trial Initiation Period (2013-2017)
Table 18.20  Clinical Trials: Distribution by Phase of Development
Table 18.21  Clinical Trials: Distribution by Recruitment Status
Table 18.22  Clinical Trials: Distribution by Indication
Table 18.23  OpenBiome: Revenues 2015, Distribution by Revenue Source (USD Million)
Table 18.24  CDIs: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
Table 18.25  CDIs: Distribution of Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
Table 18.26  IBS: Distribution of Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
Table 18.27  Ulcerative Colitis: Distribution of Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
Table 18.28  Crohn’s Disease: Distribution of Pipeline by Product Type and Development Stage
Table 18.29 Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Cumulative Funding Instances, Pre-2011-2017
Table 18.30  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Cumulative Funding Amount, Pre-2011-2017 (USD Million)
Table 18.31  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Distribution by Type, Pre-2011-2017
Table 18.32  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Distribution by Total Amount Invested, Pre-2011-2017 (USD Million)
Table 18.33  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Distribution of Type of Funding Based on Amount Invested (USD Million)
Table 18.34  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Leading Players 
Table 18.35  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Most Active Investors 
Table 18.36  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Distribution by Type of Product
Table 18.37  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Investments: Amount Invested by Type of Product and Type of Investment, Pre-2011–2017 (USD Million)
Table 18.38  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Cumulative Trend (Pre-2013–2017)
Table 18.39  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Distribution by Type of Partnership
Table 18.40  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Distribution by Therapeutic Area
Table 18.41  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Distribution by Type of Product
Table 18.42  Microbiome Therapeutics and Diagnostics Partnerships: Distribution by Most Active Companies 
Table 18.43  Overall Microbiome Market: Conservative, Base and Conservative Scenario, 2017-2030 (USD Million)
Table 18.44  Overall Microbiome Market: Distribution by Type of Application, Conservative, Base and Conservative Scenario, 2017-2030 (USD Million)
Table 19.45  Overall Microbiome Market: Distribution Geography, 2020, 2025, 2030 (USD Million)
Table 18.46  Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Therapeutic Areas, Conservative, Base and Conservative Scenario, 2017-2030 (USD Million)
Table 18.47  Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Market Attractiveness Analysis by Therapeutic Area, 2023-2030
Table 18.48  Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Product Type, 2020, 2025, 2030 (USD Million)
Table 19.49  Microbiome Therapeutics Market: Distribution by Leading Players, 2020, 2025, 2030 (USD Million)
Table 19.50  Overall Microbiome Market: Conservative, Base and Optimistic Forecast Scenario, 2017-2030 (USD Billion)

Listed Companies

The following companies and organizations have been covered in this report.

  1. 4D Pharma
  2. AbbVie
  3. Academisch Medisch Centrum - Universiteit van Amsterdam (AMC-UvA)
  4. Accinov
  5. ActoGeniX (aquired by Intrexon) 
  6. Admera Health
  7. Advanced Technology Ventures
  8. Advancing Bio
  9. Adveq
  10. Aetna
  11. Alaven Pharmaceutical
  12. Alexandria Venture Investments
  13. Allergan
  14. A-Mansia
  15. American College of Gastroenterology
  16. Amrita Therapeutics
  17. ANIP Acquisition Company
  18. AOBiome
  19. APC Microbiome Institute at University College Cork 
  20. Aptalis 
  21. Arena Pharmaceuticals
  22. ARTPred
  23. Asia Microbiota Bank
  24. Assembly Biosciences
  25. AstraZeneca
  26. Atlas Venture
  27. Auto-ID Labs
  28. Aventis Pharma
  29. Avid Biotics
  30. Axial Biotherapeutics
  31. Azabu University
  32. Azitra
  33. B.V. Patel Pharmaceutical Education & Research Development (PERD) Centre
  34. Bacs-Kiskun Megyei Korhaz
  35. Bayer 
  36. BIOASTER
  37. Biocartis
  38. Biofortis Mérieux Nutrisciences
  39. BioGaia
  40. Biogen
  41. Biohit 
  42. Biome360
  43. Biomecite Diagnostics
  44. BIOMILLENIA
  45. BiomX
  46. Bio-Rad
  47. Biose
  48. Biosortia Pharmaceuticals
  49. Blue Turtle Bio Technologies
  50. Boehringer Ingelheim International
  51. Boston Children’s Hospital
  52. Boston Medical Center
  53. Brigham and Women's Hospital
  54. Bright Medicine Clinic
  55. Bristol-Myers Squibb 
  56. BTER Foundation 
  57. C3J Therapeutics
  58. Caelus Health
  59. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology
  60. Canadian Digestive Health Foundation
  61. Capsugel
  62. Carna Biosciences
  63. Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (CSMC)
  64. CHAIN Biotechnology
  65. Chinese University of Hong Kong
  66. Chr. Hansen
  67. Cigna
  68. Cipac Therapeutics
  69. Cipla
  70. Cleveland Clinic
  71. Clinical-Microbiomics
  72. ClostraBio
  73. Cobra Biologics
  74. Commense (a subsidiary of PureTech Health)
  75. CosmosID
  76. Crohn's and Colitis Foundation
  77. Cykinso
  78. Da Volterra
  79. Dairy Innovation Australia Limited (DIAL) 
  80. Danisco
  81. Danone
  82. Dava Pharmaceuticals
  83. Debiopharm
  84. Deerfield Management
  85. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
  86. Department of Health and Human Services, US
  87. Dermala 
  88. Diversigen
  89. Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs
  90. Eli Lilly 
  91. EmblemHealth
  92. Emulate
  93. Enterome bioscience 
  94. EpiBiome
  95. Epiva Biosciences
  96. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 
  97. Evelo Biosciences
  98. Evolve Biosystems
  99. Evotec
  100. ExeGi Pharma
  101. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Workgroup
  102. Ferring Pharmaceuticals
  103. Finch Therapeutics
  104. Flagship Ventures
  105. Flora Therapeutics
  106. French National Institute for Agriculture Research
  107. FUJIFILM Diosynth Biotechnologies
  108. Fundacion para la Investigacion Biomedica del Hospital Universitario Ramon y Cajal
  109. G.D. Searle
  110. Genentech
  111. Genetic Analysis
  112. Genewiz
  113. Genova Diagnostics
  114. GMU Microbiome Analysis Center (MBAC), George Mason University
  115. Goodgut
  116. Google
  117. GSK
  118. GT Biologics
  119. Gujarat Venture Funds 
  120. Gustave Roussy
  121. Gusto Global
  122. Hadassah Medical Center
  123. HealthNet
  124. HealthPartners
  125. Hervana
  126. Hoffmann-La Roche
  127. Horizons Ventures 
  128. HOST Therabiomics
  129. Human Longevity
  130. Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center
  131. Hy Laboratories
  132. IBM
  133. Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai
  134. Igen Biotech Group
  135. Illumina Accelerator
  136. ImClone
  137. Immune Biologics
  138. ImmuneBiotech 
  139. Immunex
  140. Immuron
  141. Indiana University
  142. Industrifonden
  143. Inserm
  144. Institute for Biomedical Research Dr Josep Trueta of Girona, Spain
  145. Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine
  146. Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics Academy of Science, Czech Republic
  147. Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, India
  148. Instituto Biomar
  149. International Agency for Research on Cancer 
  150. Intract Pharma
  151. Intralytix
  152. Intrexon
  153. Invesco Asset Management 
  154. Ironwood Pharmaceuticals
  155. IS-diagnostics
  156. Ixcela
  157. J. Craig Venter Institute
  158. Janssen
  159. Javelin Venture Partners
  160. Jinan Central Hospital
  161. Johnson & Johnson
  162. Kaleido Biosciences
  163. Kelsey Research Foundation
  164. Kenézy Gyula Korhaz es Rendelointezet 
  165. Kindstar Global
  166. King's College, London
  167. KOLU POHAKU TECHNOLOGIES
  168. Kurma Partners
  169. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  170. Leadiant Biosciences
  171. Leading BioSciences
  172. Leiden University Medical Center
  173. Life Sciences Partners
  174. LifeForce Capital
  175. Lille Teaching Hospital (CHRU)
  176. List Biological Laboratories
  177. Longwood Fund and Domain Associates
  178. LuinaBio
  179. Lundbeckfond Ventures
  180. MaaT Pharma
  181. Massachusetts General Hospital
  182. MatriSys Bioscience
  183. Matrix Capital Management
  184. Mayo Clinic
  185. McMaster University
  186. Medeva Pharma Suisse
  187. Medical College of Wisconsin
  188. Medical University of Graz
  189. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  190. Merck
  191. Metabiomics
  192. MetaboGen
  193. Metrodora Therapeutics
  194. Microbiome Diagnostics
  195. Microbiome Health Research Institute
  196. Microbiome Insights 
  197. MicroBiome Therapeutics (formerly NuMe Health)
  198. MicrobiomeDX
  199. Microbiota Company 
  200. MicroViable Therapeutics
  201. Millennium Pharmaceuticals
  202. Miomics
  203. Mirna Therapeutics
  204. Miskolci Semmelweis Korhaz es Egyetemi Oktatokorhaz
  205. Miyarisan Pharmaceutical 
  206. Molecular Research 
  207. Monarch Labs 
  208. Monash University
  209. Morgenthaler Ventures
  210. MyBiotics
  211. Naked Biome
  212. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)
  213. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
  214. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
  215. National Institutes of Health
  216. Nestlé Health Science
  217. New Enterprise Associates
  218. New Zealand Society of Gastroenterology
  219. Nizo food research
  220. Novartis 
  221. Novo Nordisk
  222. NuBiyota
  223. NYU Langone Medical Center
  224. Odense Patient Explorative Data Network(OPEN)
  225. Odense University Hospital
  226. Omega Biomics
  227. OmniBiome  (acquired by Therapeutic Solutions International)
  228. One Way Liver  (OWL Metabolomics)
  229. OpenBiome
  230. Oragenics
  231. OrbiMed
  232. Orexigen Therapeutics
  233. Origin Sciences
  234. Osel
  235. Osi Pharmaceuticals
  236. Owlstone Medical
  237. OxThera
  238. Patheon
  239. Perrigo Pharma
  240. Pfizer
  241. Pharmacia & Upjohn 
  242. Phi Therapeutics
  243. Phylagen
  244. Physiogenex
  245. Pierre Fabre 
  246. Prev
  247. Prime Value Capital Management
  248. Priority Health
  249. Procarta Biosystems
  250. ProDigests
  251. Prometheus Laboratories
  252. Public Health England
  253. PureFlora 
  254. Qianfoshan Hospital, China
  255. Quay Pharma
  256. Quorum Innovations
  257. Rambam Health Care Campus
  258. Rebiotix
  259. Regence Blue Cross Blue Shield
  260. Regence Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina
  261. Regeneron Pharmaceuticals
  262. Region Skane
  263. Resilient Biotics
  264. Resphera Biosciences
  265. RIKEN
  266. Rise Therapeutics
  267. Ritter Pharmaceuticals
  268. Roche Laboratories
  269. Rock Springs Capital
  270. RondinX
  271. Royal Perth Hospital 
  272. Sandoz (Novartis)
  273. Sanofi
  274. S-Biomedic
  275. SciBac
  276. Science 37
  277. Seattle Children's Hospital
  278. Second Genome
  279. Sejtterapia Kozpont 
  280. Seraph Group
  281. Seres Therapeutics
  282. Servier
  283. Seventure Partners
  284. Shandong University
  285. Shire
  286. Shoreline Biome
  287. Sicor
  288. Silicon Valley Bank
  289. Siolta Therapeutics
  290. SLS Venture
  291. Spruce Capital Partners
  292. SR One
  293. St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton 
  294. Stanford University School of Medicine
  295. Stason Pharmaceuticals
  296. Sucampo
  297. SungentBio Venture
  298. Sunstone Capital
  299. Swecure
  300. Symberix
  301. Symbiotic Health
  302. Symbiotix Biotherapies
  303. SynbiCITE 
  304. Synco Bio Partners
  305. Synlogic
  306. Synthetic Biologics
  307. Szabolcs-Szatmar-Bereg Megyei Korhaz es Egyetemi Oktatokorhaz
  308. Taiho Pharmaceutical
  309. Takeda Pharmaceutical
  310. TargEDys
  311. Tate & Lyle Ventures
  312. Tech Coast Angels
  313. Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center
  314. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
  315. The BioCollective
  316. The Broad Foundation
  317. The Danish Rheumatism Association
  318. The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University
  319. The Jackson Laboratory (JAX)
  320. The Miriam Hospital
  321. The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
  322. The Psoriasis Association, Denmark
  323. The Second Hospital of Shandong University
  324. Therabiome
  325. Therapeutic Solutions International
  326. Thryve
  327. Trayer Biotherapeutics
  328. Tucana Health
  329. uBioDiscovery
  330. UCB Pharma
  331. UD-Genomed
  332. UM Ventures, University of Maryland
  333. University of Alberta
  334. University of British Columbia
  335. University of Calgary
  336. University of California, Irvine
  337. University of California, Los Angeles
  338. University of California, San Francisco
  339. University of Cape Town
  340. University of Chicago
  341. University of Debrecan
  342. University of Guelph
  343. University of Maryland
  344. University of Nebraska 
  345. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  346. University of Pennsylvania
  347. University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy
  348. University of Southern Denmark
  349. University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston
  350. University of Tokyo
  351. University of Toulouse
  352. University of Wisconsin, Madison
  353. Vaiomer
  354. Vedanta Biosciences (a subsidiary of PureTech Health)
  355. Ventrus Biosciences (merged with Assembly Pharmaceuticals in May 2014)
  356. Veristat
  357. Vertex Pharmaceuticals
  358. Viking Global Investors 
  359. Viome
  360. Virginia Commonwealth University
  361. ViThera Pharmaceuticals
  362. VIVUS
  363. Wavepoint Ventures
  364. Weizmann Institute of Science
  365. Wellmicro
  366. West China School of Stomatology, Sichuan University 
  367. Whole Biome
  368. Wolfson Medical Center
  369. World Gastroenterology Organziation
  370. Wyss Institute
  371. Wyssta Investments
  372. Xycrobe Therapeutics
  373. Yakult Honsha 
  374. Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital
  375. Ysios Capital
  376. Zaluvida
  377. Civet BioSciences
     

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